The news: A group of 20 states, led by Washington, are suing the federal government over rules that could allow the sharing of 3D-printed gun blueprints online. The lawsuit was filed in a US District...

The details: The federal government looking to change the law to allow 3D-printed gun blueprints to be shared on the internet. Yesterday, the Trump administration published rules which would transfer oversight for the export of certain firearms from the State Department to the Commerce Department, claiming it would promote exports and reduce the regulatory burden on gun makers. Critics fear it will lead to an escalation of gun violence. The lawsuit states that deregulation will “make it far easier for individuals ineligible to possess firearms under state or federal law to obtain a deadly weapon without undergoing a background check,” according to the AP.

The background: This fight has been rumbling for a long time. Back in 2013, a pro-gun activist group called Defense Distributed posted blueprints for a 3D-printed gun online. They were ordered to take them down by the Obama administration, but fought back, claiming in a lawsuit against the government that it had a First Amendment right to share the files. It lost. But then in June 2018, the Trump administration granted the company permission to post the blueprints online. Last year a federal judge struck this attempt down. Now the Trump administration is trying yet again to allow the sharing of 3D-printed gun blueprints online.

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The CEO of 23andMe told CNBC her company will lay off 100 people as sales of its direct-to-consumer gene tests slump. ...

“This has been slow and painful for us,” CEO Anne Wojcicki told the website, which estimated the cuts would pare about 15% of the company's staff. 

Boom times: Sales of DNA tests that tell people their ancestry and health facts started booming a few years ago, propelled by TV and Internet ads hawking the promise that people could gain unique insights from their genes.

During 2018, the total number of people who had ever bought the tests doubled, swelling the databases of 23andMe, Ancestry, and several smaller companies to over 26 million people all together.

The bust: Now, all signs are that sales of the $99 consumer tests slowed dramatically in 2019.

Our own calculations suggest the largest companies in the space sold only four to six million of them, meaning the databases would have grown by just 20% during the year. That would have been the slowest growth rate for the DNA test industry ever. 

Uncertain causes: It's not clear why consumers stopped buying tests in droves. It could be that the market is tapped out, and there aren't many people left curious to learn what percent French or Nigerian they are, or whether they are at risk for going bald.

Others may have concerns about their DNA data staying private, since police have started accessing smaller ancestry databases to carry out genetic manhunts.

Ancestry, which maintains the largest database, of more than 16 million people, did not answer questions about whether it had seen a sales slowdown. Last year, Ancestry introduced new health offerings in what some analysts saw as a bid spark a "re-testing" market, or coaxing consumers to pay for an additional test. 

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Space

NASA has announced the first 16 science and technology payloads it plans to send to the moon next year. As a part of the Commercial Lunar Payloads Services (CLPS) program, the instruments will be...

Laying the ground work: Before humans set foot on the moon in 2024 (or later, probably), NASA wants to do a little prep work. The agency hasn’t run any on-the-ground research on the moon since the Apollo program. It’s never landed at the South Pole, a place that’s supposed to be a treasure trove of water ice reserves that could prove useful to human exploration efforts in the future (and where Artemis is focusing its efforts). And there are a ton of new spaceflight technologies it wants to test out before the real deal. 

The payloads: There are too many to list, but the most interesting ones are critical for helping us land humans on the surface, or could give us a better clue of where the water ice is and how we can access it.

They include the laser retro-reflector array (LRA) and Navigation Doppler Lidar for Precise Velocity and Range Sensing (NDL), which are meant to provide precise data for landers trying to touch down on the surface, and the Neutron Spectrometer System (NSS) and the Neutron Measurements at the Lunar Surface (NMLS) instrument, designed to detect the presence of water near the lunar surface. The Stereo Cameras for Lunar Plume-Surface Studies (SCALPSS) experiment will study surface plumes created during a lander’s descent, to help engineers build better vehicles for the moon and Mars. 

How will they get there? NASA is bullish about the fact that it wants to use Artemis as a launchpad for opportunities for the private space industry. Astrobotic is building the first lander, Peregrine. It will carry 11 payloads to the surface and be launched on a United Launch Alliance rocket.

The second lander, called Nova-C, is being built by Intuitive Machines. It will carry five payloads and be launched on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. Both missions will launch in 2021. 

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